New executive team appointed at the Mojave Desert Land Trust

The Board of Directors of the Mojave Desert Land Trust has selected a new executive team to lead the organization as it enters a new era in its land conservation work. Cody Hanford and Kelly Herbinson will serve as joint Executive Directors, when outgoing Executive Director Geary Hund steps down on October 31.

Volunteer Orientation (Virtual)

Saturday, June 5, 2021 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 pm Whether through land stewardship, plant conservation, education and outreach, or administration, there are plenty of ways you can help us carry out our mission to preserve the Mojave Desert for future generations. If you are not yet registered as a volunteer, you can join Mary Cook-Rhyne and…

Mojave Desert Land Trust releases 2020 annual report

For immediate release  May 18, 2021 Contact: Jessica Dacey, Director of Communications Phone: 760-820-2275 Email: jessica@mdlt.org    Mojave Desert Land Trust protected 7,500 acres in 2020 Joshua Tree, CA – The Mojave Desert Land Trust has released its 2020 annual report. Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, over 7,500 acres of conservation lands were…

Action alert: Help protect the Joshua tree

This post was originally published on this site Photo: Brandy Dyess/MDLT (This article was updated on September 21, 2020) We are at a critical juncture for the western Joshua tree. It may seem impossible to imagine the southern California desert without its signature Joshua tree forests, but without adequate protective measures to address impending threats, it’s a very…

Know your desert pollinators, and the plants they rely on

This post was originally published on this site Native plants in the Mojave Desert are visited by hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. These pollinators are vital to our ecosystem. But they need our help. Diadasia bee covered in pollen of desert chicory (Rafinesquia neomexicana) ©Madena Asbell By Madena Asbell, Director of Plant Conservation Programs Pollinators are among the many…

It’s alive! The hidden microbial communities below our feet

This post was originally published on this site Easily missed, biocrusts are ecosystem engineers in the soil. Here’s why we need to watch where we step. Placidum lichen growing around quartz with some patches of cyanobacteria. Photo: Brianne Palmer By guest writer, Brianne Palmer California’s deserts are harbors of biodiversity — filled with blossoming wildflowers, charismatic animals, and imperceptible…

Preserving a symbol of the desert

This post was originally published on this site The search for signs of life of desert tortoise on the Mojave Desert Land Trust’s properties. By Luke Basulto, Land Steward Imagine life four inches from the ground. (Photo: Luke Basulto/MDLT) You would see things from a very different perspective. From just four inches up you would only see what…

Wildlife cameras pinpoint movement of protected bighorn sheep

This post was originally published on this site Take a close look at the horns of this desert bighorn sheep. The rings are a sign of how old he is. This detailed image is from a wildlife camera in Mojave Trails National Monument. For the past few months, the Women in Science Discovering our Mojave (WISDOM) project has…

Wildlife cameras provide close-ups of bighorn sheep

This post was originally published on this site By Elena Palacios, Women in Science Discovering Our Mojave intern Afton Canyon is known locally as the “Grand Canyon of the Mojave”. It not only has impressive geological formations, but it is one of the few places where the Mojave River flows above ground all year. Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis…

Desert plants — and the desert floor itself — are key fighters of climate change

This post was originally published on this site The so-called ‘barren’ lands of the Mojave actually play an important role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere. Creosote on Mojave Desert Land Trust property in Mojave Trails National Monument. Photo: Marinna Wagner/MDLT If you were to dream up a landscape designed to fight climate change, it’d likely be…